How To Train Your Dog To Stop Jumping On Guests – Professional Dog Training Tips


– One of the most common questions that we asked from our students in classes is what to do when people
come to their door. Often, dogs will bark or
jump and get overexcited, so today we’re gonna talk to
you about an easy solution that you can use with your dog to help get better
control of the front door. My name’s Kayl McCann,
this is five-month-old Border Collie Beeline,
welcome back to McCann dogs. (guitar strum)
(dog yapping) One of the best ways in dog training to get rid of an unwanted behavior is to replace it with a
behavior that you do want. Now, I want my dog to do
something calm and controlled when somebody comes to the door, so when somebody knocks at the door, I’m gonna give my dog a
behavior like lying down or sitting and waiting
in order to prevent them from rushing to the door and jumping up. The very first thing that I do when somebody knocks on my door is figure out where the dog is. Now, when I have a young dog,
they’re most often than not wearing a leash in the house, and that way if something unexpected happens, I can get control of the dog immediately. Before actually opening the door, I need to make sure that my dog is in some type of control position. Now, in our home, it’s really easy because we have a separated sunroom from where our kitchen is, so
I’ll have her sit or lie down on the steps to our
kitchen, and her boundaries that she’s not allowed
to step into the sunroom unless she has permission,
so I work her into a sit, or work her into a down position, I reward several times for
her maintaining the position, and in the beginning, I might
not go and open the door right away, I’m gonna focus
more on what the dog is doing and rewarding her for making good choices, so I might walk to the door, reward her for remaining in the
door, and just basically switch back and forth between addressing the person at the door, and making sure that my dog is still
under control and happy. Now, if you have a house that doesn’t have the same setup as ours, as you just have an open area into your
home, you can actually make your own boundary, whether you put a line down on the floor, some
people have carpet to tile and you can suggest that the dog doesn’t go down to the tile
area by the front door, some type of boundary is
best to let the dog know where they can and cannot be. Once you’ve opened the
door to let somebody in, the first thing that I would
do is go back and reward my dog for making a good choice. My goal is to try and set
the dog up for success, so I’m gonna reward
her more often than not to help her maintain the down. As soon as you start testing them and start to build the
distance between the rewards, you start to bring up the opportunity that the dog may make a mistake by getting up and jumping on the person, so in the beginning, your rewards need to be very frequent
in order to keep the dog in the position that you’re hoping for. If your dog does happen to
get up from that position, all you need to do is pick up the leash, take your dog back to that position that you wanted them to remain in, and then wait a few moments for them to hold before you reward. I suggest that you try this first off with your family members. Have somebody go outside and
practice knocking the door or ringing the doorbell
and then coming in. Sometimes it’s easier to get success using people that your dog
is already familiar with, rather than waiting for
that spur-of-the-moment time when the pizza man comes to the door, or a mail guy, or something like that. When it’s somebody that’s new, dogs can often make more errors because they’re not as
familiar with the situation. One of the most important
things about dog training is that you need to be consistent, and you need to present a clear picture. If you happen to have a
dog that gets overexcited when people come to the
door, I highly recommend that you have some type
of leash or a long line attached to them so that if
you need to take control, it’s really easy for you to do so. Now, we post new videos
every single Thursday, so if you liked today’s video
and you found it helpful, make sure you come back and check out the rest of our videos. For now, I’m Kayl McCann
and happy training.

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15 Responses

  1. AuthenticSound says:

    Great video ! One of the consequences of being in the Videolabs class with Ken, is that our daughters really want a dog… and mom and dad for longtime wanted one, so… we're thinking on a golden retriever, we have enough place here and Sofie, she's 11 will go to the dog school with it. She could use some confidence in public spaces, so that could help grow that !

  2. World Towning says:

    Is it normal to have a dog on the leash all the time. I have not had a dog in a while, but that is not a practice that I usually did.

  3. Brain Candy TV says:

    LOVE IT! Great video guys! You're really putting all of that Video Labs training into good use here. The new studio setup looks really professional. Great training tips too. I'll have to try this with Lizzy. She's an "old dog" but I think she can still learn some new tricks. 🙂 Cheers, Michael

  4. Jack Whitt says:

    Great channel!  I just lost the best dog I've ever had in my life last July.  This will be a great resource if I replace her.  Excellent job!

  5. McCann Dog Training says:

    Are you struggling with an overly excited dog who rushes your guests? Let us know in the comments below!

  6. Dave Vanhouten says:

    Great Video Kayl !! we are learning a new language ! Thanks for the help guys . Cheers Dave

  7. Kazzy says:

    Our boy (13 months old) goes crazy if he thinks anyone is coming to the door. I tried following your steps but he’s so over-aroused he doesn’t register anything at all. I’ve tried putting his bed in the hall to give him a clear boundary and rewarding him for staying there as I go back and forward between him and the door (-without a doorbell ringing or anyone else being there) and he’s ok with me going to the door, touching the door, playing with the door handle, opening the door a tiny crack, …. but that’s as far as I can get. As soon as I open the door any further he goes nuts, barking and running to the door. I’m trying to take baby steps and not go too fast for him but I seem to be stuck at this point, and have been for a few months now. Any advice on what I could do to help him cope? Thanks so much.

  8. chris gast says:

    Is it possible to reward a dog for barking when someone is present, to keep their distance and to stop barking after I've opened the door? If so, about how long would it take? Or is that too complex for the dog?

  9. Cooper the Dachshund says:

    I mad a new trick with my dog ita]s called dance with me do you think I can have that trick and also have dance as well would I have to say the command for this trickm

  10. McCann Dog Training says:

    Are you looking for more Puppy Training tips? Check out our "Good Puppy Management" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7BBgLulherme4idlvhGWSxsb5HHDyF_Q
    Thanks for watching! ~Ken

  11. Rebecca Stack says:

    Suggestions to teach my dog to not come into the kitchen unless invited, my front door is in the kitchen

  12. Linda Martin says:

    Hi there. You have a pack of dogs, and I have five resueltos dogs, many rescued as adults. They go crazy when someone arrives at the door. Do you recommend I work with each one separately? it is just that the idea of five dogs I. My house with five leaches on them, I. Case someone comes to the door is a bit overwhelming. Help!

  13. Chloe Wilson says:

    Hi, my dog doesn’t jump when people come to the door because he just doesn’t care and he’s outside all the time. So I have 2 questions. 1. We can’t have our dog inside because anytime we have him inside he eats everything, jumps up on the counter, and doesn’t listen at all. How do we bring him inside and how do we train him to get into the house?
    2. Like I said he doesn’t jump when people come to the door but today we went to the pet store and he saw people. He freaked out. Also when I take him on walks if he sees any person or dog he flips. We know that this is called impulse control,but how do you fix it? He’s a golden doodle age 1 1/2.

  14. Manpal Singh says:

    Ooooho

  15. Chuck F. says:

    How early can you start this type of training, is an 8-10 week too young to fully grasp this? Thank you!

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